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Me and You and Everyone We Know

Ellen Geer, John Hawkes, Brad William Henke, Miranda July, Jordan Potter

Directed by Miranda July
Rolling Stone: star rating
5 3.5
Community: star rating
5 3.5 0
June 9, 2005

Performance artist Miranda July hits a grand slam as the writer, director and of her first film. It's a moonbeam romance laced with tling wit and gravity. July plays Christine, a video artist who earns money by driving an elder-cab and sees shoe salesman Richard (John Hawkes) as relationship material, even though he set his hand on fire when his wife left him. Richard has two sons: Robby (Brandon Ratcliff), 7, who chats up adult women on the Internet using his own personal fixation with poop as a lure, and Peter (Miles Thompson), 14, who lets two older girls fellate his penis in a blow-job competition.

It's July's gift to locate a common humanity in the strangest of bedfellows. There's not an ounce of shame or arty superiority in her hilarious and heartfelt film. Her unique take on the world is cause for celebration.

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