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Little Fockers

Ben Stiller, Robert De Niro

Directed by Paul Weitz
Rolling Stone: star rating
5 1
Community: star rating
5 1 0
December 21, 2010

The second sequel to 2000's Meet the Parents defines uncalled for. Little Fockers is upchuckingly unfunny. After nearly overdosing on Viagra, Robert De Niro gets it up. The movie never does.

Video: Peter Travers Blasts Little Fockers in This Week's At the Movies

The plot? Ben Stiller's Greg and wife Pam (Teri Polo) are prepping a 5th birthday party for their twins (cue the pee-poop-puke jokes). De Niro's Jack, the ex-CIA guy and Greg's pop-in-law, arrives with wife Blythe Danner to celebrate. Dustin Hoffman and Barbra Streisand, as Greg's parents, just phone in it — literally. I'm falling asleep writing this. Director Paul Weitz, taking the reins from Jay Roach (who wised up and moved on after two of these fock-ups), seems equally narcotized. If there is another sequel, it better be called Fock the Fockers.

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