.

Kinky Boots

Linda Bassett, Josh Cole, Gwenllian Davies, Joel Edgerton, Chiwetel Ejiofor

Directed by Julian Jarrold
Rolling Stone: star rating
5 2.5
Community: star rating
5 2.5 0
April 4, 2006

Don't worry. It just sounds like another bad Sharon Stone movie. Kinky Boots trips on its contrived plot, but this blend of trash and sass is a comfy fit. Joel Edgerton (Uncle Owen in Wars II and III) is appealingly cast as Charlie Price, the inheritor of a British shoe factory that's on wobbly financial legs.

Charlie's chance encounter with Simon (Chiwetel Ejiofor), a drag queen who performs under the name of Lola, changes his fortunes. When Charlie makes a pair of industrial-strength stiletto boots for Lola to wear onstage, he finds a lucrative niche market. Director Julian Jarrold keeps the cast stepping lively. His secret weapon is Ejiofor, a stage-trained English actor of Nigerian descent known for his gravitas onscreen in Dirty Pretty Things and Inside Man. If you don't know yet how to pronounce his name (it's chew-it-tell edge-oh-for), get busy. He's a in the making who rocks this sweetly predictable comedy on its nosebleed heels.

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