.

Insidious

Rose Byrne, Patrick Wilson

Directed by James Wan
Rolling Stone: star rating
5 2.5
Community: star rating
5 2.5 0
March 31, 2011

Here's a better-than-average spook house movie, mostly because Insidious decides it can haunt an audience without spraying it with blood. This is major since director James Wan is the artery sprayer who gave us the first slice of the Saw series.  The plot is yet another succubus feeding off The Amityville Horror and Paranormal Activity with teacher dad (Patrick Wilson) and songwriter mom (Rose Byrne) moving into an old house with their two young sons and a new baby. That's when things start to go bump in the night and one son (Ty Simpkins) falls into a coma.

The Ten Scariest Movie Scenes of the Last Decade, From 'The Ring' to 'Paramormal Activity'

The reasons you won't slip into a snooze is that Wilson and Byrne play it for real and Wan and witty screenwriter Leigh Whannell work you over like pros. In a multiplex ready to sucker punch us with wimpy kids and animated swill about Easter bunnies that hop-hop-hop, Insidious thinks we'll be better served by a scare flick that can fry nerves and tickle funnybones in high style. I sure was.

The Complete Archive: Over 20 Years of Peter Travers' Movie Reviews Now Online

prev
Movie Review Main Next

ADD A COMMENT

Community Guidelines »
loading comments

loading comments...

COMMENTS

Sort by:
    Read More

    Movie Reviews

    More Reviews »
    Around the Web
    Powered By ZergNet
    Daily Newsletter

    Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

    Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
    marketing partners.

    X

    We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

    Song Stories

    “Try a Little Tenderness”

    Otis Redding | 1966

    This pop standard had been previously recorded by dozens of artists, including by Bing Crosby 33 years before Otis Redding, who usually wrote his own songs, cut it. It was actually Sam Cooke’s 1964 take, which Redding’s manager played for Otis, that inspired the initially reluctant singer to take on the song. Isaac Hayes, then working as Stax Records’ in-house producer, handled the arrangement, and Booker T. and the MG’s were the backing band. Redding’s soulful version begins quite slowly and tenderly itself before mounting into a rousing, almost religious “You’ve gotta hold her, squeeze her …” climax. “I did that damn song you told me to do,” Redding told his manager. “It’s a brand new song now.”

    More Song Stories entries »
    www.expandtheroom.com