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Green Card

Gerard Depardieu

Directed by Peter Weir
Rolling Stone: star rating
5 0
Community: star rating
5 0 0
January 11, 1991

Fresh from his triumph in Cyrano de Bergerac, Gallic wonder Gérard Depardieu takes on Hollywood and the English language in this captivating romantic bonbon filmed in New York by writer-director Peter Weir (Dead Poets Society). Depardieu plays an out-of-work French composer who enters into an arranged marriage with an American horticulturist, played by Andie MacDowell. She gets an apartment that only accepts married tenants, and he gets a green card, i.e., a U.S. work permit. Don't look for the originality and grit that distinguished Weir's Australian films Picnic at Hanging Rock and Gallipoli, Green Card has all the heft of a potato chip. But Depardieu's charm recognizes no language barriers, and MacDowell, the revelation of sex, lies, and videotape, proves a fine, sexy foil.

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