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Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift

Lucas Black, Lil' Bow Wow, Brian Tee, Sung Kang, Jason Tobin

Directed by Justin Lin
Rolling Stone: star rating
5 1
Community: star rating
5 1 0
June 19, 2006

The F&F franchise ran out of gas half way into the 2001 original. There is no excuse for this second sequel unless you don't mind watching a muscle car showroom disguised as a movie. Lucas Black as Sean, a troubled American teen who avoids a jail sentence by relocating to Tokyo and living with his Navy ramrod of a dad (Brian Goodman). There he collides with a pileup of gearhead cliches as well as the Japanese phenom of "drift racing" in which drivers slide cars around hard corners at super speeds. Director Justin Lin started promisingly with Better Luck Tomorrow, took a wrong turn with Annapolis, and now careens into disaster with a movie that suffers from blurred vision, motor drag and a plot that's running on fumes. Look out for a cameo — it's the only surprise you'll get from this heap.

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