.

Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood

Sandra Bullock, Ashley Judd, James Garner, Fionnula Flanagan, Ellen Burstyn

Directed by Callie Khouri
Rolling Stone: star rating
5 0
Community: star rating
5 0 0
June 5, 2002

Chick flicks aren't all hell. Look at Thelma and Louise. So when Callie Khouri, the Oscar-winning screenwriter of that feminist firecracker, decided to make her directing debut and co-write the film version of Rebec, Sidda bitches about life with her mom, Vivi (Ellen Burstyn). Big mistake. Vivi disowns her, refusing to come to her wedding. That leaves the inevitable reconciliation in the hands of Vivi's Ya-Ya girls club: Caro (Maggie Smith), Teensy (Fionnula Flanagan) and Necie (Shirley Knight). They come to New York, drug and kidnap Sidda, and force her (and us) to endure countless confusing flashbacks to the younger Ya-Yas. Except for Ashley Judd, who shows true grit as Vivi in her babe days, the effect is like being buried in molasses. For guys whose pain threshold is way low when it comes to the bonding of Steel Magnolias, Ya-Ya is a definite no-no.

prev
Movie Review Main Next

ADD A COMMENT

Community Guidelines »
loading comments

loading comments...

COMMENTS

Sort by:
    Read More

    Movie Reviews

    More Reviews »
    Daily Newsletter

    Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

    Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
    marketing partners.

    X

    We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

    Song Stories

    “Vicious”

    Lou Reed | 1972

    Opening Lou Reed's 1972 solo album, the hard-riffing "Vicious" actually traces its origin back to Reed's days with the Velvet Underground. Picking up bits and pieces of songs from the people and places around him, and filing his notes for later use, Reed said it was Andy Warhol who provided fuel for the song. "He said, 'Why don't you write a song called 'Vicious,'" Reed told Rolling Stone in 1989. "And I said, 'What kind of vicious?' 'Oh, you know, vicious like I hit you with a flower.' And I wrote it down literally."

    More Song Stories entries »
    www.expandtheroom.com