.

Angie

Geena Davis, James Gandolfini

Directed by Martha Coolidge
Rolling Stone: star rating
5 0
Community: star rating
5 0 0
March 4, 1994

Geena Davis gives a sexy, scrappy performance as Angie Scacciapensieri, a tart-tongued street goddess from Bensonhurst, N.Y. Angie refuses to marry Vinnie (James Gandolfini), the Italian stallion who knocks her up. Screenwriter Todd Graff (Used People) tailored the role of Angie for Madonna, which seems like better casting than the choice of Davis, a statuesque Massachusetts WASP who doesn't exactly blend in on the streets of Brooklyn. But Davis can act, even with the accent, and she can nail a laugh and break your heart in a flash. What she can't do is save this romance from sinking in soap-opera suds.

The plot veers wildly between whimsy and angst. Davis is most at ease trading quips with Vinnie and her best friend, Tina (Aida Turturro). She even sets off sparks with Stephen Rea (The Crying Game) as Noel, a mop-topped lawyer who thinks pregnant women are hot stuff. Then Graff lowers the doom boom. The baby is born handicapped; Noel turns rat; Angie searches for her lost mother. Director Martha Coolidge, so adept at nurturing the feminist subtext in Rambling Rose, tries to show Angie finding strength in adversity. It's no go. In the end, the cliches shout down Angie's truth.

prev
Movie Review Main Next

ADD A COMMENT

Community Guidelines »
loading comments

loading comments...

COMMENTS

Sort by:
    Read More

    Movie Reviews

    More Reviews »
    Around the Web
    Powered By ZergNet
    Daily Newsletter

    Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

    Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
    marketing partners.

    X

    We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

    Song Stories

    “Madame George”

    Van Morrison | 1968

    One of the first stream-of-consciousness epics to make it onto a Van Morrison record, his drawn-out farewell to the eccentric "Madame George" lasted nearly 10 minutes, combining ingredients from folk, jazz and classical music. The character that gave the song its title provoked speculation that it was about a drag queen, though Morrison denied this in Rolling Stone. "If you see it as a male or a female or whatever, it's your trip," he remarked. "I see it as a ... a Swiss cheese sandwich. Something like that."

    More Song Stories entries »
    www.expandtheroom.com