.

ABCD

Sheetal Sheth, David Ari

Directed by Krutin Patel
Rolling Stone: star rating
5 0
Community: star rating
5 0 0
April 2, 2001

ABCD, a stunning family drama about cultural displacement, is the extraordinary work of writer-producer-director Krutin Patel, who came to America from India in 1974 at the age of eight. His film (the title is an acronym for American-Born Confused Desi) tells the story of Nina (Sheetal Sheth), a young Indian woman living in America who rebels against the Hindu upbringing of her widowed mother, Anju (the great Madhur Jaffrey). Nina sleeps around, and almost exclusively with white men. Her more traditional brother, Raj (Faran Tahir), an accountant, tries to toe the line by agreeing to an arranged marriage. In this funny, touching and haunting film, Patel cuts through stereotypes to show the hard truths of straddling two cultures. ABCD is due for distribution soon; seek it out.

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