Why Stephen King Was 'Very Jealous' of George R.R. Martin

'Game of Thrones' author's involvement with TV series inspired horror writer for 'Under the Dome'

Stephen King george r. r. martin game of thrones
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Stephen King
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Stephen King, the international bestselling author that has been giving the world nightmares since his first novel Carrie in 1974, typically cedes TV and film adaptations of his work over to others. But with next week's season premiere of Under the Dome, the author looked to another writer for inspiration on being more involved with the series.

"I knew that George R.R. Martin had written a few episodes of Game of Thrones and I was very jealous," King told the Los Angeles Times. Thanks, in part, to Martin, King has been a more active writer on the series adapted from his 2009 sci-fi novel of the same name.

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The revisiting of Under the Dome gives King the unique chance as a writer to explore the world and characters he has already created and give them new life through a different medium. This can please both fans of the original work and newcomers to the TV adaptation, bringing in a wider, more dedicated, audience. 

While the novel itself took place in a few months, King hopes to greatly expand the 1,000-page Under the Dome and the apocalyptic undertones that come along with it. "I know it’s a very long novel," King told Buzzfeed, "but it covers a very short time. So when they came to me with the TV show and said, ‘We want, if the show’s a success, to cover months and years,’ I thought, Oh man, this is what I wanted to do in the first place!"

Even with all of the recent adapting being done himself, King told Buzzfeed he’s still excited for HBO’s adaptation of his series "The Dark Tower," directed by Ron Howard. "I was very excited when Ron Howard got involved with that project," King said. "His original take on it was the best. He wanted to do the movies — three tentpole movies — interspersed with a number of TV series that covered Roland and his adventures as a young man. It was a brilliant concept, and I’m pretty sure it would have worked. [But] what sometimes happens in Hollywood and in filmmaking is, the financing fell apart, or the studio started to have second thoughts."