The 100 Greatest Movies of the Nineties

From serial killers to slackers, 'Fight Club' to 'Pulp Fiction' – the best comedies, dramas, thrillers and killer horror flicks of the 1990s

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'Goodfellas' (1990)
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Joe Pesci, Ray Liotta, Robert De Niro Everett Collection1/100

1. 'Goodfellas' (1990)

"As far back as I can remember, I always wanted to be a gangster." Martin Scorsese's woozy, dizzy adaptation of Nicholas Pileggi's slice-of-Mafia-life book Wiseguy is many things: a social anthropology study, an epic look at the American Dream, a coked-up nightmare, a nostalgic look back at an age when made men were made men, a head-spinning display of virtuosic filmmaking, the blueprint for the modern organized-crime saga and a peerless look at a world where you might be slapped on the back or shot in the face. "Mob guys love it, because it's the real thing," Pileggi told GQ. "They say, 'It's like a home movie.'" And as you watch Ray Liotta's Henry Hill go from up-and-coming crook to cosa nostra bigwig to Witness-Protection-Plan "average nobody," you realize you're getting a funhouse-mirror reflection of an old-fashioned U.S. of A. bootstrap success story, complete with bespoke Italian suits, bulging cashrolls and Bolivian-marching-powder meltdowns.

Every performance, from the holy trinity of Liotta, Robert De Niro and Joe Pesci ("Funny like I'm a clown, I amuse you?") to the round-the-way guys in the background, feels pitch-perfect. Its movie-mad references run the gamut from The Godfather to The Great Train Robbery; its soundtrack incorporates everything from Bobby Darin to Donovan, the Stones to Sid Vicious. (After that murder montage, filmmakers are essentially forbidden from using Layla's coda to score a scene ever again.) Its influence is incalcuable – you don't get a million moving-camera showstoppers without that Copacabana tour, and you definitely don't get the Tarantino, et al., mix of black humor and horrifying violence without Goodfellas' getting that combination down to a science first. And though Scorsese had made great movies before and would make great ones after this, this Mob-flick hit feels like a summation of his culturally specific, universally thrilling cinema about men on the edge. There are movies that may be more emblematic of the Nineties, but this was the one that set the pace for the entire decade – a high mark that left most other contenders to the throne looking like schnooks. DF

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