10 Best Movies We Saw at 2017 Toronto Film Festival
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Our picks for the 10 best movies we saw at 2017 Toronto International Film Festival – from Louis C.K.'s cringe-comedy to a female coming-of-age movie. Courtesy of TIFF

We came, we saw, we dropped Visine into our tired eyes and then we saw some more – over the past 11 days, we've let the 2017 Toronto International Film Festival dominate our viewing time with a host of unique visions, singular voices and the occasional marquee-name project gambling on the event's award-season platforming skills. Some 50 movies later, we staggered out of the city's screening rooms and theaters having seen some major duds (let us never speak of Suburbicon again), a few genuinely disturbing works of art (we still think the festival should hand out "I Survived Caniba" for anyone who made it through that explicit, experimental documentary on Japanese cannibal Issei Sagawa) and a handful of films that reminded us why – streaming services and serial TV binging be damned – there's nothing quite like sitting in a dark room with a crowd of strangers and emerging, 90 minutes to three hours later, having just taken part in a communal lifechanging experience.

Here are the 10 films we consider the best things we saw at TIFF 2017 – the ones we'll still be talking about and thinking about long after the red carpets have been rolled up and put into storage until next year. (Some additional shout-outs to: Frederick Wiseman's extraordinary Ex Libris; Scott Cooper's Searchers-throwback Western Hostiles; Agnes Varda's late-act collaborative documentary Faces/Places; the last half of Brawl on Cell Block 99; the epic look at Parisian ACT UP activists B.P.M. (Beats Per Minute); the Canadian zombie flick Les Affames; The Florida Project and Molly's Game, both coming to a theater near you very soon); the sheer balls on Darren Aronofsky for making mother!; and Argentine director Lucrecia Martel's jungle-love takedown of colonialism and empire-building Zama.)