'PUBG' Creator On Growth and Becoming As Big As 'League of Legends'

"100 million active users a month, I think, something stupid like that? If we play our cards right, maybe we can get to that level of users."

PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds is, by all intents and purposes, an anomaly. Still in early access, the game has sold more than 10 million units, set multiple concurrent player records and has even been considered in early Game of the Year talks. By the way, did we mention, it still hasn't been fully released?

So, does this meteoric rise ever stop? Well, maybe eventually. But according to creative director and creator Brendan Greene, he hopes it's no time soon.

Speaking to the industry publication gamesindustry.biz, Greene says when he thinks about PC success, he only looks to one game. And while his own game is immensely successful, it can't hold a candle to it yet.

"Our sales curves are just going up. They're not slowing down," he told the outlet. "I'm still waiting for that plateau, and it's just not happening yet. When you ask about growth on PC, I just look at League of Legends. 100 million active users a month, I think, something stupid like that? If we play our cards right, maybe we can get to that level of users."

While, sure, that's a lofty number, at this point it doesn't seem impossible for Battlegrounds. It took the game just shy of six months to hit its current 10 million player record, and no one expects that number to slow down. In fact, it completely stands to reason the game is just getting started. Aside from its commercial growth, Battlegrounds recently had its first offline invitational and it's become Steam's most-played non-Valve game. Who's to say it can't hit 100 million players on PC?

One issue the Battlegrounds team has run into with its game's meteoric success, however, is maintaining a staff large enough to keep the game stable. As the game gets bigger and bigger and millions of players keep hitting its servers, developer and publisher Bluehole is having trouble staffing up quickly enough to support the game.

"You're trying to roll out changes that you can only test so much internally, on local servers. There's big risks, and you see that when servers go down; it's because of this huge growth, and that the platform we built we just didn't imagine would be hitting these numbers," Greene said.

The surprising success of Battlegrounds seems to have come with quite the learning curve for the development team, but it's not slowing down. While Greene stressed to the outlet it had no current plans to bring the game to any platforms other than PC and Xbox One, he did say – possibly in jest – that next year would be the year the game reaches "world domination."