11 Things That Would Make 'Zelda: Breath of the Wild' Even Better

It's about as perfect as a video game can get, but that's not to say we wouldn't change anything about it

A Way to Repair Weapons That Doesn't Break the Game
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It's only natural to get attached to rare finds or powerful artifacts, and hanging them up in your house can feel like a waste Nintendo5/11

A Way to Repair Weapons That Doesn't Break the Game

You're charging through the Gerudo Desert, or the Hebra Mountains, or even Hyrule Castle itself, weapons clanging as you deal blow after blow to Lizalfos, Moblins and Bokoblins of all colors. Suddenly your royal halberd or your electric greatsword or some other blade that's so awesome you're positive you'll never find another one like it shatters into particles that flit away in the breeze, lost forever.

This is not a unique experience in Breath of the Wild, and it's likely every player has at some point wondered why there's no way to repair damaged weapons before they break for good. The game does a perfectly good job providing you with enough new gear that you'll rarely be helpless, but it's also natural to get attached to rare finds or powerful artifacts, and hanging them up in your house can feel like a waste.

What Breath needs is a special blacksmith in a hard-to-reach, end-game area – say, deep within the impregnable bowels of Hyrule Castle – who will restore a weapon's durability for a very high price. That way the game has it both ways: With the cost too high and the spot too remote for you to repair weapons regularly, you'd still have to let them break and pick up new ones most of the time, while saving only your most precious treasures for the blacksmith's healing hammer.

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