Bill Nye: Bill Belichick Deflategate Defense 'Doesn't Make Sense at All'

The real Science Guy says only a needle could deflate the Patriots' footballs to their AFC Championship game condition

With less than a week before Super Bowl XLIX kicks off in Glendale, Arizona on February 1st, all eyes aren't on how the New England Patriots' offense matches up against the Seattle Seahawks' stifling defense, if quarterback Tom Brady can win another championship or even what Katy Perry has planned for the halftime show. Instead, Deflategate is still the talk of the Super Bowl.

On Friday, Patriots coach Bill Belichick took to the podium to illustrate a scientific explanation on why the Pats' footballs were underinflated to an illegal level, blaming "climatic conditions" and the way the footballs were rubbed down. This caused the press to playfully dub him "Bill Belichick the Science Guy." Good Morning America got in touch with the real Science Guy, Bill Nye, who said that Belichick should stick to drawing up defensive schemes and not molecular activity.

"What he said didn't make any sense," Nye said. "Rubbing the football, I don't think you can change the pressure. To really change the pressure, what you really need to change the pressure is one of these – the inflation needle." Nye also joked that he isn't worried about his job as "the Science Guy" with Belichick now on the Deflategate case.

While it was enjoyable for football fans to watch the notoriously taciturn Belichick rattle off science terms like "equilibrium state" and "atmospheric pressure" in a live press conference, the coach's long-winded, weather-blaming explanation for why the Patriots' footballs deflated so drastically still has one major fallibility: Why didn't the Colts' game-ready footballs also experience a pounds-per-square-inch drop when confronted with the same weather conditions?