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Kiki Kannibal: The Girl Who Played With Fire

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Danny Cespedes was never far from her mind, however. Keeping tabs on him, Kiki knew he'd returned to Florida and was dating yet another 14-year-old. She also knew investigators were closing in. On October 19th, 2007, police finally arrested Danny on seven felony counts of statutory rape. At least, they tried. They found him at the Aventura Mall, surrounded by a group of young girls, with cocaine stashed in his shoe and pills in his backpack. "I don't have Ecstasy anymore," Danny blurted out as officers patted him down. He didn't resist as police cuffed his hands behind his back and walked him onto a pedestrian bridge on the second floor of the parking garage. Just then, a gust of wind blew some paperwork out of an officer's hand. In that moment of confusion, Danny suddenly hurled himself over the four-foot railing. He might have been aiming for the roof of a construction van parked below, hoping to flee; instead, Danny's foot caught the railing, and he tumbled to the pavement. He fell into a coma. Two months later, Kiki's rapist and first love was dead.

Around that same time, a visitor appeared in Kiki's Stickam chat room and posted a link: Stickydrama.com. When Kiki clicked it, she found a site dedicated to jeering at Stickam users — especially her. It was much like the thrashing she'd been getting all along, except this site had ads for XXX sites and was far more professional-looking than anything Kiki, now 15, had ever encountered. Little wonder, because Stickydrama's founder was no teenager but a grown man looking to cash in on teen drama.

Christopher Stone (born Watermeier) was a 28-year-old New Orleans native who earned degrees from Berkeley and NYU before settling in Los Angeles and launching Stickydrama. (He also launched Stickynoodz, which compiled naked photos of teens from social-networking sites.) With spiky dark hair, an eternal five o'clock shadow and a charming smile, Stone looks like a metrosexual version of Girls Gone Wild impresario Joe Francis. He co-founded the site after watching Stickam's growing popularity and realizing that enabling commenters to poke fun at Stickam users was a potential gold mine.

Stone wouldn't comment for this article, but Stickam videos reveal him to be a fluid, articulate speaker — even when his self-applied caption labels him as "Drunk." His intelligence comes through in his online postings; as he edifies his public on the origins of democracy or on proper grammar usage, he seems to view himself as a cultivated smut peddler, more Hugh Hefner than Larry Flynt.

Stickydrama quickly became the go-to site for gossip on wanna-be Web celebrities, as well as a clearinghouse for videos of the ill-advised things teens are prone to doing on their webcams, like masturbating, stripping, getting oral sex from their dogs. In 2009, Stickydrama posted images of a 20-year-old raping an unconscious girl. Rather than condemn the assault, Stickydrama took a couple of guesses as to the victim's identity ("It's hard to tell one dumb blonde from another") before concluding that she "probably won't even think it's a big deal."

Focusing on top Stickam entertainers like Kiki Kannibal was a sure way to draw traffic to Stickydrama, and at first its treatment of Kiki wasn't much worse than anyone else's. But in May 2008, Stickydrama posted a photo of Danny Cespedes dead in his coffin, alongside an item called "MySpace Murder Mystery." It detailed Danny's fatal fall, adding, "Rumor has it that Kiki Kannibal had cooperated or plotted with the police" out of revenge for Danny dumping her. As a result, Stickydrama declared Kiki "responsible for his death." Online response was furious, as consensus that Kiki had killed Danny spread throughout the Internet. "I'm gonna fucking kill her," wrote a Stickydrama commenter. Someone posted Kiki's grandmother's address and phone number, and Kiki's stalkers went into immediate overdrive. Fake Craigslist ads promoted her sexual services. She became a favored target of hackers, who hijacked her Stickam page and broadcast themselves; her phone was hacked, and her voicemails were posted online.

"Someone in my neighborhood would write me, saying, 'I see you walking your dog,' and describe my dog," says Kiki, who stopped leaving the house alone. "I was so on edge and anxious and paranoid." Already mentally fried over her rape, Danny's death, everything — she began to fantasize about suicide.

The Ostrengas tried taking action. When Cathy reached out to Stickydrama's administrator and demanded the removal of the "MySpace Murder" item, the response infuriated her. "If she were my own child I would have taken that fucking computer and Sidekick away a long time ago," wrote the administrator, presumably Stone. "If you had your daughter's best interests at heart, you would put an end to the 'Kiki Kannibal' fame that is obviously so unhealthy at her age."

State cops told the Ostrengas that Stone could face misdemeanor harassment charges — but that since he was so far away, the family should plead its case to the LAPD. The LAPD took a report on Stone, but determined the case didn't meet its criminal filing criteria. The Ostrengas also tried getting Stickydrama's Web host to pull the plug, but Stone countered by arguing that Kiki was a public figure whose image he could use however he wanted — even when it meant posting a user's Photoshopped picture of her getting fucked by a dog. The site stayed up.

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