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FBI Arrests Revenge-Porn Rogue Hunter Moore for Conspiracy

He's indicted on 15 counts involving email hacks

FBI building
Joe Raedle/Getty Images
January 23, 2014 4:50 PM ET

Earlier today, FBI special agents arrested and indicted Hunter Moore, who once ran the revenge-porn website IsAnyoneUp.com, and his alleged hacker accomplice Charles "Gary" Evens. Both arrests occurred without incident. The pair were charged in a 15-count indictment, which claims the men were embroiled in a conspiracy that involved hacking into people's email to steal their nude photos and post them online. Furthermore, the FBI said Moore allegedly paid Evens for nude pics that the latter had hacked from hundreds of victims' email accounts.

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In a 2012 interview with Rolling Stone, Moore was sure that some of the site's nude photos were hacked. He maintained that he never hacked anyone himself and that he didn't know how to do it. Regarding the decision to sell the site that year, he said that "ruining people's lives with naked pictures wasn't, you know, the ideal job."

Formally, the indictment charges the men with conspiracy, seven counts of unauthorized access to a protected computer to obtain information and seven counts of aggravated identity theft. The indictment lists seven victims by their initials only and said that their email accounts contained "among other things" nude pictures of themselves and others.

It also said that the pair, with others who are still unknown, conspired "against the United States" to "access a protected computer without authorization to obtain information for financial gain." It details 57 "overt acts," beginning in October 2011 in which Evens contacted Moore to discuss explicitly how to hack into emails and that hacking was illegal.

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How much does a person's dignity cost in dollars? The indictment said Moore offered to pay Evens $200 per week for his services. In December 2011, Evens requested $250 for nude pictures of "six guys and six girls." According to the document, Moore paid Evens as little as $135 for his services and as much as $900 in individual payments through March 2012. The indictment is signed by four U.S. attorneys, who work in cyber and intellectual crimes, property crimes and the U.S. attorney's Criminal Division.

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