Drawn Out: The 50 Best Non-Superhero Graphic Novels

Disaffected hipsters, cyberpunk dystopias, cranky ducks and boy geniuses: here are the greatest comic-story collections that don't feature caped crusaders

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'Maus,' Art Spiegelman

Courtesy Knopf

Art Spiegleman had been serializing the extraordinary story of his father's time in Auschwitz in his art-comix magazine Raw since 1980, with mice standing in for Jews and cats for Nazis. After some revisions, Pantheon published the game-chaing first half in 1986, popularizing the term "graphic novel" in the process. (A sequel, a partial reflection on the success of the first half, arrived in 1991.) The language barely existed to honor such a creation, yet that didn't stop Spiegelman's anthropomorphic story of wartime atrocities from winning a special Pulitzer in 1992. It's the single best comic of a year that also produced Alan Moore's Watchmen and Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns, which is saying something.

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