Watch Margo Price Talk Trump, Play 'All American Made' on 'Daily Show'

"If we want to keep politics and celebrities separate then we shouldn't elect a reality TV star as president," country singer told Trevor Noah

Margo Price promoted her acclaimed second LP, All American Made, on Tuesday's Daily Show, chatting with host Trevor Noah about her music's political and social themes. The emerging country star rejected the idea that songwriters should sidestep current headlines to appease a broader fanbase, using President Trump's election win to prove her point. "It's funny how polarizing everything has been, and now there's especially this mentality from certain fans or people who want to keep politics out of music – this 'shut up and sing' mentality that we've had," she said. "I would say if we want to keep politics and celebrities separate then we shouldn't elect a reality TV star as president."

Price also discussed misconceptions about the term "feminism" and the importance of inspiring her younger female fans. "I want to set a strong example and be a role model to women out there and younger girls that we don't have to be a sex symbol – we can speak our mind and say the things we want to say," she said. "I'd like to break down some gender roles that I think have been instilled in us for so long. That's what I hope people take away – and men, too."

The singer described All American Made as offering "more [of] an outward look" than her 2016 debut LP, Midwest Farmer's Daughter. "This album was me traveling the United States and the rest of the world this past year and kind of postcards from each of those places and what I saw through my windshield," she said. "There are so many things to look at right now in the U.S. You gotta watch out, keep your eyes focused or you might crash."

Price also performed the album's folky title-track, which contrasts American patriotism with political critiques. "1987 and I didn't know it then/ Reagan was selling weapons to the leaders of Iran," she crooned over acoustic guitar and piano. "But it won't be the first time, baby, and it won't be the end/ They were all American made."