See Singer Becca Mancari's Gorgeous, Panoramic 'Golden' Video

Songwriter and member of Bermuda Triangle with Brittany Howard and Jesse Lafser will release her solo album 'Good Woman' October 6th

Becca Mancari's new album 'Good Woman' arrives October 6th.

Much of singer-songwriter Becca Mancari's music is tinged with sadness and longing, sometimes evoking the wide-open expanses of desert found in the American West. In the new video for "Golden," Mancari plays a solitary figure roaming through that awe-inspiring landscape.

Mancari worked with director Calvin Brue on the video, the two of them filming DIY-style in various locations around Arizona. She's pictured surveying vast canyons, trudging down narrow pathways and even turning her collar up for warmth in the midst of an unexpected snowstorm – always alone, but somehow perfectly comfortable in each frame.

"Even when I look at that film we made, I feel at home in those landscapes," says Mancari. "I feel like my true self is not fully experienced when I'm not there."

"Golden" was inspired by the prolonged breakup of two of Nashville-based Mancari's housemates, embodying the struggle to finally let go as well as the tender care they tried to show one another through the process. The song appears on the Nashville-based Mancari's debut album Good Woman, due out October 6th, along with other folk-rock gems such as "Arizona Fire," "Summertime Mama" and the hypnotic "Good Woman," all of which combine Mancari's acoustic guitar work and confident vocals with spacious, hazy production touches.

"It feels very sparse but also filled with atmosphere," she says. "It's what we were wanting to go for – this feeling of like you're swirling in the sound. It makes you feel like you're in a dream."

In addition to releasing her solo debut, Mancari is a member of the new trio Bermuda Triangle with Alabama Shakes singer Brittany Howard and fellow songwriter Jesse Lafser, who played a surprise gig in Nashville earlier in summer. They're currently working on their debut album as well, ensuring that Mancari's career is about to start accelerating rapidly.

"I've always been a little late on the curve," says Mancari. "I've always had to learn the hard way. I've always been very 'live by experience.' A lot of my 20s were about just experiencing things so I could write this record, so I could be this person. I think if that would have happened when I was younger, you would ask me that question and you would have seen a year later that I'd go up in flames."